Sole Source Justifications

We have extensive experience with government purchasing: for a formal government justification document and sole source justification click here.

Why blast curtains?

Blast curtains are designed to capture glass shards propelled by an explosion. They are one of the most effective options in window retrofitting, physical security solutions:

  • Capture and contain flying glass shards, depositing them safely on the floor thus saving lives and mitigating injury. In an urban bomb blast 85% of deaths and injuries result from flying glass (Glass, 2003)*
  • Allow the building to vent an external or internal explosion
  • Allow for emergency egress out of the building as well as access into the building
  • Can be easily removed and/or relocated, making them easy to use in leased facilities
  • Provide better protection than film through a wider range of pressures
  • Do not void window warranties. In contrast, window films and tints often void window warranties
  • Offer a backup in case of film failure on filmed windows
  • Do not look like a security upgrade
  • Are aesthetically pleasing and allow light and visibility
  • Diffuse light glare
  • Have been approved for use by the Historical Preservation Society primarily because they do not require re-engineering, reinforcement or restructuring of the window opening to perform as designed. Blast curtains are one of the best options for historic buildings
  • Can reduce energy costs by as much as 20%. In some cases, blast curtains have been approved by the GSA as Energy Conserving Technologies.

Regulatory compliance

Safetydrape® meets all the following regulatory requirements:

  • Designated and certified as a QATT (Qualified Anti-Terrorism Technology) by the Department of Homeland Security
  • Has been granted liability coverage under the SAFETY Act by the Department of Homeland Security
  • Provides Certified Installation to comply with the SAFETY Act
  • Has passed US Government test criteria ASTM F1642
  • Is available on GSA Contract

Case Study: Oklahoma City Bombing

The following chart was created after the Oklahoma City Bombing and shows how widespread glass breakage is in the event of a bombing or act of terrorism. The A.P. Murrah Federal Building is shown in yellow and it is clear that glass breakage occurred many blocks away from the intended target. Although the surrounding buildings were not specifically targeted, they were affected because of their proximity to the Murrah Building.

Building Inspection Area

   A.P. Murrah Federal Building
   Collapsed Structure
   Structural Damage
   Broken Glass / Doors

Competitive Analysis Chart (PDF)

*Glass, S. J., 2003. Assessment, Development, and Testing of Glass for Blast Environments, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Sandia National Labs.